What to look for on the label

At Clean Beauty Collective, we believe that “clean beauty” is about providing you with products that are not harmful to you or the environment, starting with the ingredients that are not found in any of the products we sell.  Clean also means ethically safe and none of our products are tested on animals.  We work closely with each of our partnered brands to ensure that they aren’t including any of these in the products they create.  Our list of “Dirty Ingredients” is ever evolving and regularly updated by our team of experts who are researching daily on new advancements in the green beauty space.

Ingredient

Animal By-Products including Animal Oils and Fats, Animal Musks

Excludes Lanolin and Bee Products

Why is it used?

A range of animal by-products are used in cosmetics, skincare products, nail polishes and hair products for various reasons.

Why we should avoid it

Highly allergenic.  Ethics around the treatment of animals.

What to look for on the label

  • Stearic Acid (only animal derived)
  • Shellac
  • Guanin
  • Squalene (only animal derived)
  • Tallow
  • Animal Hair (Accessories)
  • Hydrolyzed Silk
  • Keratin
  • Lactoferrin

Ingredient

BHA

Why is it used?

A waxy solid found in a variety of cosmetics as a preservative and stabiliser.  Acts as an antioxidant and fragrance ingredient.  Commonly found in lipstick and eye shadow.

Why we should avoid it

Linked to cancer, skin irritation and hormone disruption.

What to look for on the label

BHA (Butylated Hydroxyanisole)

Ingredient

BHT (Butylated Hydroxytoluene)

Why is it used?

Used as a preservative and acts as an antioxidant and fragrance ingredient.

Why we should avoid it

A toluene-based ingredient linked to irritation of the skin, eyes or lungs.

What to look for on the label

BHT

Ingredient

Chemical Sunscreens

Why is it used?

Chemical Sunscreens include harmful ingredients such as oxybenzone, octisalate, octocrylene, homosalate and oxtinoxate to protect skin from harmful UV rays.

Why we should avoid it

Linked to hormone disruption

What to look for on the label

  • Benzophenone
  • Diphenylmethanone Diphenyl Ketone
  • 119-61-9
  • Benzoylbenzene
  • Phenyl Ketone
  • Oxybenzone
  • 2-Hydroxy-4 Methoxybenzophenone 131-57-7
  • Benzophenone-3
  • (2-Hydroxy-4-Methoxyphenyl)

Ingredient

EDTA

Why is it used?

Chelating Agents
(binding agent)

Why we should avoid it

Harmful to the environment as they do not break down.

What to look for on the label

  • Calcium Disodium EDTA
  • Tetrasodium EDTA
  • Trisodium EDTA

Ingredient

Ethanolamines

Why is it used?

Used in cosmetics as an emulsifier or foaming agent.

Why we should avoid it

Linked to cancer

What to look for on the label

  • Triethanolamine
  • Diethanolamine
  • DEA
  • TEA
  • ETA
  • Cocamide DEA
  • Cocamide MEA
  • DEA-cetyl phosphate
  • DEA oleth-3 phosphate
  • Lauramide DEA
  • Linoleamide MEA
  • Myristamide DEA
  • Oleamide DEA
  • Stearamide MEA
  • TEA-lauryl sulfate [2]

Ingredient

Ethoxylated Ingredients
These are generally contaminated with 1, 4-Dioxane (a carcinogen and nerve toxin)

Why is it used?

Synthetically produced ingredients using Ethylene Oxide (a known carcinogen).  Used as a solvent and stabiliser in skin care and hair care products including shampoo, liquid soap, bubble bath and hair relaxers.

Why we should avoid it

A known carcinogen (causes cancer).

What to look for on the label

Ethoylated compounds are found in these ingredients and should be avoided :

  • PEGS, including PEG (Polyethylene Glycol) compounds, like PEG-100 Stearate, PEG-7 Glyceryl Cocoate, PEG-40, and its related chemicals. (There are over 1000 PEG ingredients listed in the international Nomenclature of Cosmetics Ingredients Database)
  • Polysorbate-40
  • Steareth-20
  • Sodium Laureth Sulfate (SLES), Ammonium Laueth Sulfate, and most ingredients ending in “-eth”

Ingredient

Formaldehyde-Releasing Preservatives

Why is it used?

Formaldehyde is released by several cosmetic preservatives.

Why we should avoid it

Carcinogenic.
Causes irritation of the skin, eyes or lungs.

What to look for on the label

Releasers include :

  • Dmdm Hydantoin
  • Diazolidinyl Urea
  • Imidazolidinyl Urea
  • Tosylamide/Formaldehyde Resin
  • Quaternium-15
  • Sodium Hydroxymethylglycinate
  • 2-Bromo-2-Nitropropane-1,3-Diol
  • Polyoxymethylene Urea
  • 5-Bromo-5-Nitro-1,3 Dioxane
  • Glyoxal
  • Methenamine
  • Benzylhemiformal

Ingredient

Hydroquinone

Why is it used?

Found in skin lighteners, skin cleansers, facial moisturisers, hair conditioners and finger nail coating products.

Why we should avoid it

Causes skin irritation and discolouration.  Lung irritation.  Linked to organ toxicity and cancer – the ingredient is a metabolite of the carcinogen benzene.

What to look for on the label

  • Hydroquinone

Ingredient

Methyl Cellosolve or 2-Methoxyethanol

Why is it used?

Used as an additive in perfumes

Why we should avoid it

It can cause skin irritation and may cause effects on the central nervous system, blood, bone marrow, kidneys and liver.
This ingredient is banned in the EU.

Ingredient

Methylisothiazolinone (MIT) and Methylchloroisothiazolinone (CMIT)

Why is it used?

Widely used preservatives found in liquid cosmetics and personal care products.

Why we should avoid it

Inhalation toxicity, allergies and possible neurotoxicity.
These ingredients have been banned in leave-on skin products in the EU.

What to look for on the label

Methylisothiazolinone (MIT) :

  • 2-methyl-4-isothiazoline-3-one
  • Neolone 950 preservative
  • MI
  • OriStar MIT
  • Microcare MT

Methylchloroisothiazolinone (CMIT) :

  • 5-Chloro-2-methyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one

MCI

Ingredient

Parabens

Why is it used?

Found in Shampoos, conditioners, moisturisers, facial and shower cleansers and scrubs.

Why we should avoid it

Linked to hormone disruption and cancer.

What to look for on the label

  • Ethylparaben
  • Butylparaben
  • Methylparaben
  • Propylparaben
  • Isobutylparaben
  • Isopropylparaben
  • Other ingredients ending in -paraben

Ingredient

Petrolatum and Paraffin

Why is it used?

Found in a range of cosmetics

Why we should avoid it

These ingredients are petroleum distillation by-products.  They are banned because of unsustainable sourcing and possible PAHs contamination.

PAH (Polyaromatic Hydrocarbons) are linked to cancer.

These ingredients can be comedogenic to the skin

What to look for on the label

  • Petrolatum
  • Petroleum Jelly
  • Paraffin Oil
  • Paraffin Wax
  • Mineral Oil
  • White Petrolatum

Ingredient

Phthalates

Why is it used?

Found in colour cosmetics, fragranced moisturisers, body washes, hair care products and nail polish.

Why we should avoid it

Linked to hormone disruption and cancer.

What to look for on the label

  • Phthalate
  • DEP
  • DBP
  • DEHP
  • Fragrance (Synthetic)

Ingredient

Resorcinol

Why is it used?

Most common in hair dyes, also in shampoos/hair lotions, peels and in products used to treat acne, eczema and other dermatological issues.

Why we should avoid it

Linked to skin and eye irritation, allergies and hormone disruption

What to look for on the label

  • Resorcinol
  • 1,3-benzenediol
  • Resorcin
  • 1,3-dihydroxybenzene (m-hydroxybenze, m-dihydroxyphenol)

Ingredient

Toluene

Why is it used?

Found in nail polish, nail treatments and hair dyes

Why we should avoid it

Toxic to the immune and reproductive system

What to look for on the label

Toluene

Ingredient

Triclosan and Triclocarban

Why is it used?

Found in deodorants, shaving products, creams and colour cosmetics.

Used as an antibacterial and preservative.

Why we should avoid it

Linked with hormone disruption and harmful to the environment

What to look for on the label

  • Triclosan (TSC)
  • Triclocarban (TCC)

Other Ingredients to know about

In addition to our banned ingredients included on our Dirty List are these ingredients we think you should be informed and know about.

Clean Beauty Collective allow the use of beeswax, honey, pollen and propolis in the products we stock.  these ingredients include safe, effective skin protecting ingredients.  bees are the heart of our ecosystem, so we ask bee products to be organic where possible and that bees are humanely treated.

Lead, arsenic, mercury, aluminium, zinc, chromium and iron are common in both natural mineral pigments and synthetic colourants and found in a variety of cosmetic products, generally at trace levels.  At low levels, these heavy metals pose little risk to human health, however there are concerns about the build up in our bodies over time.  Here at Clean Beauty Collective we work with our brand suppliers to ensure heavy metals are at the lowest trace level possible according to local body regulations.  We also ask our brand partners to batch test colourants to ensure low levels are maintained.

Palm Oil is a safe, edible vegetable oil derived from the fruit of oil palms.  Whilst it is a safe, natural ingredient found in many food and cosmetic products, it is unfortunately harvested in an unsustainable and destructive manner and linked to major issues such as deforestation, animal cruelty and indigenous rights abuses in the countries where it is produced.  At Clean Beauty Collective we value the importance of working with our brand partners to create a demand for sustainably produced Palm Oil.

Linear silicones, such as Dimethicone, are unlikely to be a health concern for cosmetic users.  These large stable molecules can improve skin texture and fill in wrinkles however there are a few concerns that you may want to take into consideration when making an informed decision.  Because Linear silicones do not biodegrade well they could have a negative impact on the environment. If you have acne-prone skin, depending on the size of the ingredient and your skins sensitivity, you may find the silicones will clog your pores.

Glycols include synthetic ingredients such a Polypropylene, Propylene and Butylene Glycol.  These ingredients work to attract moisture to the skin and help to keep products stable.  These ingredients do not appear to pose a safety risk for most people.

Lanolin is the wax or oil from sheep’s wool.  we encourage our brand partners to source lanolin frm humanely raised sheep although there is no regulation around the farming of sheep globally.  NZ Lanolin is one of the best clean sources of lanolin in the world.

Clean Beauty Collective encourages our brand partners to use natural or naturally-derived ingredients instead of petroleum-derived ingredients where ever possible.  We do however allow some petroleum-derived or synthetic ingredients in our products but avoid all harmful ones listed above.  Some synthetics are safe and sustainable to use.  we evaluate every ingredient and ask our brand partners to verify their manufacturing process to ensure contamination is avoided.